What's the word?

A Place to ask all those probing questions you need answers to so you can finish your story.

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pengwenn
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What's the word?

Postby pengwenn » Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:22 pm

Okay, you're reading a novel and come across a word your not very familiar with so you look it up and WHAM-O! you've learned something new. Now's your chance to help the rest of us learn something new too. If you come across a new word that made you stop and think, share it with the rest of us and let's see how much we can learn or maybe reinforce what we already know. Who knows, we might be stuck writing the next best seller when one of your words will be just the right word we're looking for. The right words add texture and a feel to our writing so there's always time to learn new ones.

I'll get it started off with a one (okay, it's a phrase) that I've heard a few times lately.

Salad days

What does it mean? I have a general idea but I want to see if anyone knows something more specific. And why is it called that?

Once we've learned this words feel free to post a word of your own.
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Postby Mlou » Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:26 pm

hee-hee-hee I KNOW I just used that word but I'm no spoiler! :D
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Postby pengwenn » Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:38 pm

That's why I used it. You're not the first person to say that phrase to me lately. Must be a generational thing (no offense).
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Postby pengwenn » Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:40 pm

I just learned who coined the phrase and I'm surprised. I'll let a few more people peek in before I explain it.
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Postby Mlou » Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:41 pm

None taken. (I'll just stick another pin in my voodoo doll. :twisted: )
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Postby charlesp » Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:59 pm

I always associate it with something between "the good old days" and "carefree youth".

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Postby xcheck24 » Wed Feb 07, 2007 2:02 pm

i associate it with "when i was thinner"
i say "my field hockey days"
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Postby Daniel » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:43 pm

When you are on a diet?
Those times when you were convinced that being a vegetarian was a healthier choice?
"I think that in order to understand other people's suffering and distress one must have, among other things, a great imagination."

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Postby LilacWine » Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:48 am

A shame they no longer teach the classics. Although anyone who has ever looked at a book of quotations could probably make a good guess as to the originator of the phrase.
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Postby Mlou » Thu Feb 08, 2007 3:50 pm

Doesn't EVERTHING start with Shakespeare? :D
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Postby pengwenn » Thu Feb 08, 2007 4:12 pm

Ah Mlou, since you let the cat of out the bottle (as Steele would say) here's the definition:

American Heritage Dictionary

salad days

pl.n. A time of youth, innocence, and inexperience: "my salad days,/When I was green in judgment, cold in blood" (Shakespeare).


[Coined by William Shakespeare.]


Anyone else have a word or phrase we can bat around?
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Postby Mlou » Thu Feb 08, 2007 4:41 pm

Hey, that's a good one! Steele would have used it, if the occasion arose.
:oops: I thought Lilac had let the shoe drop. But I only mentioned the originator, not what it meant.

How about "panicle", which an editor changed to "pinnacle" in my book, and which I indignantly demanded be returned to the word I wanted? They also changed "made a moue" to made a mouth. And had to change it back. I'm a tough cookie. :D
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Postby Daniel » Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:07 pm

Yes, I had looked it up in my Longman e-dictionary; there they do not mention Shakespeare. The definition goes: "the time in your life when you are young and not very experienced."
"I think that in order to understand other people's suffering and distress one must have, among other things, a great imagination."



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Postby Mlou » Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:48 am

Hmmm...you also mentioned "portico", pengy, and a friend of mine objected to "balastrade".
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Postby talkwrite » Wed May 30, 2007 2:25 pm

Aha! :idea: So that's what is happening here. Today I am "Salad-brained"
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Postby pengwenn » Wed May 30, 2007 2:33 pm

Oh hey, I guess I need to pull up a few more new words here don't I? I'll have to do some checking . . .
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Postby pengwenn » Mon Jul 23, 2007 11:25 am

Okay new word for you: LOTHARIO

What do you think it means? I read it in a review of a tv show and had to go look it up.
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Postby bfsooner » Mon Jul 23, 2007 12:39 pm

SoapNet uses "lothario" a lot when describing handsome young men. I have a feeling though that lothario goes beyond just being handsome and young. I'll have to think about the contexts I've heard this one used.
Rebecca

"The name's Kaknockers...Vod Kaknockers." ~~ Jake, Two and Half Men
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Postby Mlou » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:50 pm

Yes, it does go beyond. It's more in the nature of a man who tries his "charm" on many women, while not exactly being THAT sincere with any one of them. He romances all of them.
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Postby Daniel » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:56 pm

What's the equivalent for an homosexual?
"I think that in order to understand other people's suffering and distress one must have, among other things, a great imagination."



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Postby Mlou » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:31 am

Look it up in the dictionary, Daniel, or the thesaurus.
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Postby pengwenn » Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:25 am

I thought I'd already posted the definition. Oh well. Here it is.

Lo·thar·i·o /Pronunciation Key - [loh-thair-ee-oh]
–noun, plural -thar·i·os. (sometimes lowercase) a man who obsessively seduces and deceives women.

[Origin: after the young seducer in Nicholas Rowe's play The Fair Penitent (1703)]
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Postby pengwenn » Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:28 am

I have a new word for you today. I've seen this word pop up in a few book titles recently. Do you know what it means?

REVENANT
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Postby bfsooner » Tue Aug 21, 2007 1:05 pm

Could you use it in a sentence, please? :-D
Rebecca



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Postby Mlou » Tue Aug 21, 2007 1:26 pm

He suddenly appeared like a revenant, all ghostly and pale, as if the shrouds of the grave still clung to him.
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...





GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America

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