The G Man (aka The Gingerbread Man)Discussion Thread

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Hissmonster
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The G Man (aka The Gingerbread Man)Discussion Thread

Postby Hissmonster » Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:11 pm

http://publishamerica.com/shopping/shop ... search=yes


Here you will find the link to MLou's novel The Gingerbread Man!

Everyone pick up a copy and let's discuss it!

Timberline you have read this story as have I, what were your first impressions?

PS:

Also by Mlou: click the link below to find the short stories by Mlou on Amazon.com......

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b?url ... &x=14&y=20
Last edited by Hissmonster on Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Hissmonster » Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:13 pm

Oh and Mlou

You may want to give everyone a brief intro....
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Postby charlesp » Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:17 pm

you'll want to go to PA, click on search, and then type in Gingerbread Man as PA doesn't do a good job of letting you link to the actual thing.

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Postby Hissmonster » Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:18 pm

Thanks CP...pulled the link right from the information page, so I thought it should work....
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Postby Hissmonster » Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:45 pm

I've read this book twice..and if you all know me that is going some....

But my first read was the rough draft and my second was the final version. Mlou takes the detective novel and marries it with a low-key romance.

I like the fact that the female lead is not wishy-washy. Too many times the story revolves around an insipid damsel in destress. You won't find that here....
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Postby timberline » Wed Oct 01, 2008 9:37 am

Apologies for my error on the sex-scene thread: My crit/review appears on PA. I can find anything for Mlou's book on Amazon.

My crit was that what appears trite becomes unique in its characters (the Travelers and their dialect) and literary in the interior novel and malapropisms of the private investigator.

I bought Gingerbread Man not in the expectation of great writing, but because it was written by someone whose posts are intelligent and insightful. I think it's important, too, to take a chance (read: investment) in newish writers who aren't hitting the mass market. I'd hope there are a few others who'd do the same for my Cruising the Green of Second Avenue, a $4.95 investment that will guarantee at least a small smile of recognition from its readers as well as me.
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Postby pengwenn » Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:29 am

I've read it but that was 2 years ago. Does that sound right that it's been that long? I wish I could I pull it out and review it to refresh my memory but I've pack up that part of my books for my move. What I can remember is that it felt like the book could have been made into 2. One novel for the Traveler's story and one for the mom/dectective story. There was enough there that they would have complimented each other very well. Oh and I remember the language being very poetic, but that Mlou for ya.
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Postby Mlou » Wed Oct 01, 2008 1:09 pm

Thanks, guys, for taking the time here. I'd have to re-read it myself :oops: in order to sound intelligent. I was so sick of it when I finished that it's been a while.

Hiss, CP, et al:
THE LINK AT THE BOTTOM OF MY POST TAKES YOU DIRECTLY TO THE BOOK AT PUBLISH AMERICA.

Pengie, I couldn't separate out the Travelers...They're my "bad guys". Without them there's no story. You might have been thinking of separating the klutzy detective, Steele Everhardt, protagonist of Devon's book. That was sort of a "book within the book" kind of thing.

Timber please give us a link for your book as I do want to get it. Trouble is I want it autographed. :D
Last edited by Mlou on Wed Oct 01, 2008 5:14 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America
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Postby Mlou » Wed Oct 01, 2008 1:29 pm

I'll post the scene we talked about on the other thread briefly here. I don't think there's anything objectionable in it. If so Hiss can mark it PG but it's fairly tame. As I said, let the imagination do the work.

Briefly, Devon decides he MUST discuss things with Libby, even though the hour is late. He knocks on her door. She too has been awake, stewing about telling him the truth about an incident she's kept quiet.

"...the door swung open and Libby stood there, her eyes dark, her mouth opened in an O of astonishment.
Devon was seized by a whirlpool of emotions--the fierce desire to sweep her into his arms and crush that soft O of a mouth against his own. A wave of longing crashed over him.
For a crazy moment, he thought he saw his own impulse mirrored in her eyes. He needed to get control of himself. Retreat now, talk to her later. If he touched her, he was lost.
He touched her. His hands of their own volition, slid upward over the soft roundness of her bared shoulders, coming to rest, one against her back, the other cradling her slender nape as he drew her close. Random sounds of the outside world receded, blotted out, except for Libby's startled murmur, by the thrum of his own pulse pounding in his ears.
Libby wasn't sure how it happened. Whether she had stepped into his embrace or been gathered in, she only knew that she was overwhelmed by the sensation of coming home. His was a sheltering, tender embrace and she melted into it seamlessly. Her mouth fit perfectly against Devon's, remembering ways that she herself had forgotten, or tried to forget, long ago.
A new urgency quickened within her in answer to his own. His kissed deepened and she met them eagerly, with an abandon that would have shocked her had she thought about it. But thinking had no part in this. It was all feeling, a tumultuous release of dammed up wanting and needing, multiplied by two. She was awash in raw emotion.
Only once did Devon pause, leaning back a little to look into her eyes, his own asking a question. Her answer was to enfold him again, entwining her fingers in his thick hair to further deepen and prolong their kiss. Then, still holding his hand, she stepped backward to her rumpled bed, drawing him with her.
Nor did Libby question herself on the rightness of their coming together. Tomorrow she might agonize over it, wondering what had possessed her and what had become of her vaunted good sense and proper behavior. But...tomorrow was another day."
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...





GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America
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Postby Hissmonster » Wed Oct 01, 2008 7:37 pm

I am home tomorrow...much needed day off and will chat about this then, right now I'm nursing a migraine and heading for bed....will check-in in the AM, play nicely folks :wink:
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Postby timberline » Thu Oct 02, 2008 10:55 am

Very nicely presented, Mlou--much better than my male instinct could have handled the situation.

By the way, the link to Cruising was changed by Wild Child. New link is http://www.wildchildpublishing.com/inde ... 0244ac97a3, corrected on my blogsite. Anyone wanting an autograph for an e-book need only e-mail me and receive a jpeg with my signature.
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Postby Hissmonster » Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:33 pm

Timb...I'm adding this to my purchase thread...and will set up a thread when I have started reading it.....thank you...


Mlou,

What I like about your love scenes are that they remind me of the old-fashion black and white movie scenes. They describe the prelude, the one catalystic moment where the 2 characters understand that there is no turning back and then the screen fades to black...

The details of what happens in her "rumpled bed" are not necessary, we "the readers" can make up our own fantasy based on the descriptions of the characters thus far and our own proclavities.

I know many modern day writers and screen writers think many scenes like this were hoakie. But, I disagree. One of the best over the top scenes is still Rhett Butler throwing Scarlett onto the bed...and cut...to the next morning, her smiling like a cheshire cat.

We don't need to see the touching, the lips coming together or the removal of cloth impediments....we "Know" that they happened.

The scene works well within your story. As timb says, it doesn't stand out..but it shouldn't. The point of your story wasn't the "ROMANCE". It was the quest to find something...although there is an obvious search...those of you who haven't read the book, see if you can find out what else they are searching for...

______________________________________________________________
now if you were gearing this story towards Harlequin...I would revamp it to focus on the romance and then I would look to heightening the sex scenes to more..well sex scenes. That is when you get into "peeling" and "touching" etc.....but remember, you can lose the reader with scenes like that...I mean...when I woman undresses her lover and "gushes" on the beauty of his member...well I'm sorry. Maybe I'm jaded, but "gushes" really? I don't think so. 8)
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Postby Mlou » Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:05 pm

Well, I didn't want to write anything my mother couldn't read. :D

(She once gave me a novel to read, and half way through I discovered she'd torn out pages 93 to 100! Not fit for me to read, she said, when I taxed her on it.)
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...





GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America
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Postby Hissmonster » Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:06 pm

LOL...yeah but she read it...what does that tell ya? 8)
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Postby Mlou » Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:08 pm

Every time I see this thread, my first thought is that it's about a G-Man (J.Edgar Hoover type.) Maybe we should spell out Gingerbread?
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...





GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America
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Postby Hissmonster » Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:14 pm

Rofl as you wish..though I like the ambiguity..."visitors" may think we are talking about Hoover-types...grin....
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