Rejection!

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Mlou
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Postby Mlou » Mon Mar 13, 2006 6:29 pm

pierangeli...I too wrote a query/syn in the voices of my characters once. Alas, I never had the nerve to send it out. Sent the conventional ones. Coward that I am! Actually, I wish you'd named the agents. It's nice to hear of some who can on occasion be encouraging.
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...


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Postby pierangeli » Tue Mar 14, 2006 10:13 am

Irene Kraas recommended that I send first 50 to her daughter, Ashley. Pam Ahearn has asked for my first 75 after March 20. She was located in New Orleans (and is currently working out of NY) so I assume there is still some shuffling around due to Katrina.

I'm going to send out more unusual ones just out of curiosity. The worst that can happen is I'll get yet another "Dear Author" letter...like yesterday's.
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Mlou
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Postby Mlou » Tue Mar 14, 2006 5:04 pm

Yeah, aren't they the pits? And the ones who say...."very well written, blah blah, but I just couldn't fall in love with it..." I'm not looking for love, just an agent. :roll: Anyway, I've stopped looking and going with PA just to be done with it. *sigh*
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...





GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America
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pierangeli
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Postby pierangeli » Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:34 am

I was just so excited that not only did my rejection letter *yesterday* have my name, but it also had my manuscript title. They probably used mail merge, but that's ok. At least I know they read the first line of my query.

I was getting exhausted with it and thinking about PA myself, m, so I know just where you're coming from. Then I had about three writer friends who told me if anybody should be able to get an agent, I should, so I tried for round 2. Give it another go. PA will actually end up being more work...b/c you'll have to sell the bloody things pretty much on your own.
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Postby Mlou » Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:09 pm

Well, you see, my ace in the hole is that I don't care whether the bluedy things sell or not. I just want it printed. I signed the contract today so I'm getting off the merry go round. (As for friends, mine have told me likewise and raved about the book...but friends, unfortunately, aren't agents or publishers.) I'm hoping all my WordTrip pals will PM me with their addresses so that I can add them to the announcement list. Evidently PA sends out cards when it's ready. I don't care if they BUY it, you understand, I just want this humungous address list so I'll look like a winner to them. lol
nothing is ever simply Yes or No. There's always a But...





GINGERBREAD MAN by Mary Lou Healy at Amazon.com http://www.publishamerica.com/shopping/ ... ogid=16658 at Publish America
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Postby pierangeli » Thu Mar 16, 2006 10:46 am

Nothing wrong with that. You gotta do what's right for you.
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Postby novicescribbler » Wed Mar 22, 2006 12:59 am

My guy is a PI and I am getting quite attached to him. I'm doing some short stories right now and, because I have been immersed in the book, it is tough to switch him off and go with a new approach.
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Postby CZ75 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 9:50 am

Rejections... I am coming up on ELEVEN YEARS of rejections for my first novel. That first novel was sold 11 years ago to New Line Cinema and to Dove Books, but when Dove was purchased by another company, the contract was cancelled. Since that time, I've had that novel under continuous agent representation for approx. 4,000 days. At least 7 or 8 diff. agents. No matter how good the agent is (some have been great, some have been crap) the story is the same -- rejection. My current agent has had the book for about 1.5 years. His agency just had TWO recent NY Times Bestsellers, and still no deal. If the book hadn't started out so promising (New Line sale made the cover of the Hollywood Reporter) and if I weren't able to get an agent by merely snapping my fingers, I would have, of course, quit a long time ago. How many rejections? 100 - 150 I'd say.

BY THE WAY -- are you sending your MANUSCRIPT to agents? Let me know, because that is a BIG mistake.
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."
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Postby charlesp » Mon Aug 21, 2006 9:53 am

Yowza... after 11 years has the material become dated? What happened with the New Line deal after the book sale died?

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"Coffee is sufficiently advanced technology" - Merlin Mann
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee." - Wally (Dilbert)
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Postby CZ75 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 10:02 am

charlesp wrote:Yowza... after 11 years has the material become dated? What happened with the New Line deal after the book sale died?


I've freshened it up a bit once or twice -- my characters use cell phones now, for example. I am not ALL that disappointed in New Line, because when the sale went down, my agent warned me that Hollywood only makes something like 40% of what they buy. New Line did hire a screenwriter who cranked out 2 scripts, but that was the end of it as far as I know. Renny Harlin was going to direct and Geena Davis was going to be the female lead -- they were married at the time.
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."
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Jamie Ford
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Postby Jamie Ford » Mon Aug 21, 2006 11:46 am

Wow. That's an eternity, even by Hollywood standards. You must have other projects/books you're working on though. If so, I'd say move on. Sometimes a book gets orphaned and you can only do so much to rescue it. 11 years! Wow.
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CZ75
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Postby CZ75 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:10 pm

Jamie Ford wrote:Wow. That's an eternity, even by Hollywood standards. You must have other projects/books you're working on though. If so, I'd say move on. Sometimes a book gets orphaned and you can only do so much to rescue it. 11 years! Wow.


Yes, in the meantime I have written two others -- one fiction and one nonfiction. Each of those has also had continuous representation from the day they were finished (3 and 5 years respectively, I believe). And guess what.......... Still nothing. I have just recently reached the halfway point on what will be my 3rd novel (I started a thread a few days ago). After that, I do believe that I am finished. Writing is not fun.

The question that always comes to my mind is this...

Why am I not published?
a. Despite the early success, the books are simply no good.
b. The business is just so terrible that you can write a decent book, get decent agents, and STILL expect not to get published.
c. The books are good, I SHOULD have been published, but I am just extraordinarily unlucky.

All 3 seem like bad answers. I just don't know.
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."
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Postby charlesp » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:25 pm

So, ignoring the end result of not selling again (thusfar, I'm optomistic on your behalf), what has made getting an agent easy for you? Was it primarily the early success? or do you have an "in" or a "hook" that's made getting the agent easier for you?

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." - Arthur C Clarke
"Coffee is sufficiently advanced technology" - Merlin Mann
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee." - Wally (Dilbert)
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Postby CZ75 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:30 pm

charlesp wrote:So, ignoring the end result of not selling again (thusfar, I'm optomistic on your behalf), what has made getting an agent easy for you? Was it primarily the early success? or do you have an "in" or a "hook" that's made getting the agent easier for you?


Ahh! Excellent question. Well, the agants all say, naturally, that I'm a great writer with great books. I very strongly suspect, however, that at least a few of them saw that New Line sale and that was all they needed to see. More than one of these "agents" I don't think even read my material. I certainly hope that most of them, however, just liked my work. I will say that I write a MEAN query letter and I will spend a good week or more on that bad boy before sending it out. Also, I use Herman's guide when looking for an agent. It lists, I think, 700 agents, and it tells you exactly and precisely what each agent wants and does not want. Lastly, I do massive mailouts. When I'm agent hunting, I NEVER send out less than 20 queries at a time.
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."
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Postby novicescribbler » Wed Aug 23, 2006 12:55 am

What is Herman's guide?
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CZ75
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Postby CZ75 » Wed Aug 23, 2006 8:53 am

novicescribbler wrote:What is Herman's guide?


"Jeff Herman's Guide to Literary Agents and Publishers" or something like that. The book is huge and famous and sold everywhere.
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."
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charlesp
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Postby charlesp » Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:25 am

And now there's a handy link to it on Amazon in your post :D

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." - Arthur C Clarke
"Coffee is sufficiently advanced technology" - Merlin Mann
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee." - Wally (Dilbert)
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CZ75
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Postby CZ75 » Wed Aug 23, 2006 10:40 am

charlesp wrote:And now there's a handy link to it on Amazon in your post :D


Boy! You're handy. Never could get the hang of that stuff. BTW, what is your opinion on why I'm not published?

a. Despite the early success, the books are simply no good.
b. The business is just so terrible that you can write a decent book, get decent agents, and STILL expect not to get published.
c. The books are good, I SHOULD have been published, but I am just extraordinarily unlucky

I'm sure you're way too polite to say (a), and you haven't read the material of couse, but what about (b) and (c)? Or something I've missed?
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."
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charlesp
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Postby charlesp » Wed Aug 23, 2006 10:50 am

I think it's probably a combo of both of them (with leaning toward on C because if it sold once it should sell again I'd think). We all know it's a horribly tough industry, and it's better to be lucky than good (as it is in most walks of life), but if a book was good enough to sell once (well twice I guess, the movie deal was a separate deal right?) I can't imagine there being NOBODY out there who would buy it.

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." - Arthur C Clarke
"Coffee is sufficiently advanced technology" - Merlin Mann
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee." - Wally (Dilbert)
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CZ75
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Postby CZ75 » Wed Aug 23, 2006 10:55 am

Yes, it sold twice. The theatrical rights to New Line, the print rights to Dove Books.
"We're gonna rob them blind, Stacy. We're taking everything, right down the the light fixtures and the dust under the chairs. We're gonna do them like the Grinch did Hooville."

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